Plant Databases

Plants > Plant Databases

 

Floristic Inventory of South Florida (Institute for Regional Conservation)

          This is our most trusted source to determine which species are native to Broward County. It contains the plant taxa in all ten South Florida Counties. The link below allows you to select the County and additional limiters. Choose County: Broward, and Native Status: Native, to select the 733 Broward native species.

http://regionalconservation.org/ircs/database/search/AdvSearchbyCounty.asp

 

Natives for Your Neighborhood (Institute for Regional Conservation)

          This is a wonderful site for species-specific information about size, color, culture, and native range for a variety of native plants that grow in your area. The soil, light, and moisture information will indicate whether the plant is likely to grow in the place you have in mind.

http://regionalconservation.org/beta/nfyn/plantlist.asp?County=Broward

 

The Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants (Institute for Systematic Botany, University of South Florida)

          This is the most comprehensive database of Florida plants. It includes native, non-native, and invasive species and indicates this status for each taxa. Plants native to Broward are based soley on vouchered specimen (with beautiful photographs of each archival voucher card). Plants that have not been officially vouchered from Broward are not listed as native to Broward. Click on Broward County to see all Broward taxa listed or search for a plant by name.

http://www.florida.plantatlas.usf.edu/Default.aspx

 

eFloras

          This database contains many of the plants worldwide. We link to the North America flora. Using the Advanced search you can select Florida to look among the 1,500+ Florida species listed. (Floridians can laugh at the "Elevation" option.) What sets this database apart from the others, is its key. If you search for a family or genus, for example, you can see the botanically significant distiguishing differences among genera or species. This may be the best online flora key yet available.

http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 (for North America only)

 

USDA Plants Database (US Department of Agriculture)

          Default map plant range is the "Distribution" showing where the plant can be grown from an horticultural perspective; click on the small lower left "View Native Status" to see the native range.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/

 

FNPS Native Plants for Your Area (Florida Native Plant Society)

          Create a list of plants that meet the light, water, and soil conditions of the place you have in mind to grow them. Only native plants that are more likely to be cultivated and available are listed. This is perhaps the best database to help you know which plants to locate in your garden, and in the right place in your garden.

http://www.fnps.org/plants/refinelist/Broward

 

FNPS Native Plant Communities (Florida Native Plant Society)

          Not a database of plants, but perhaps the best and easiest to understand summary of Florida native plant communities. We include it here because it is such an important complement to the species-specific information found in the databases listed here. We have maped the major Broward plant communities here.

http://www.fnps.org/resources/native-plant-communities

 

EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source of UF/IFAS Extension, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences)

          A topic-driven information database that includes species-specific pages.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_native_plants

 

Treasure Coast Plants

          John Bradford has created a wonderful database of wildflowers to help the plant enthusiast identify plants. Using the flower color, number of flower pedals, & leaf arrangement the user can find a short list to look through. This is exactly what most of other databases lack, a search designed for the common person. This database includes many, but not all, native plants in the coastal areas of Palm Beach, Martin, snd St. Lucie counties that have in common many plants also found in Broward.

http://tcplants.org

 

Ask Nature

          Created from the biomimicry concept, this database has examples of useful things we have learned or might learn from how nature builds things, processes chemicals, and transfers energy without harming the environment. Only a few use South Florida native plants as examples, but an intertesting indication of what we may yet learn from the plants that have adapted to our own local climate and habitats.

http://www.asknature.org

 

 

As with all information on this Broward (Coontie) site, we want to hear from you, especially if you have suggestions to correct or improve this public information, Richard@Brownscombe.net.

Published on  25.11.2013